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Developed Roll: Polaroid SX-70 // Polaroid Originals Black and White

It is truly exciting to see that some of my film photo friends are receiving emails regarding the shipping and delivery of the new Polaroid One Step 2.  I still eagerly await my delivery email, but I’ll try to remain patient. Back when I preordered the new Polaroid camera, I also bought a pack of new Polaroid Originals Black and White for my SX-70 to test out.

Through shooting my first pack, I have encountered a few obstacles with the film and my camera.  I have found that my cameras electronics are either on their way out, or my battery contacts need a simple cleaning.  First, on two of the shots, the camera died mid-shutter release.  Secondly, on most of the frames, I was left with a milky-look to the frames.  Not going to lie, it has left me a bit disappointed.  Not sure if this was the fault of my camera, the film, or myself for not putting the frames away from light right after shooting them.  Maybe it’s the scanner, too.  Judging by some other people’s photos with the new film, it looks like some sort of user or camera error on my end.  Ah well, better luck next time.

Overall though, it’s extremely exciting to try something new, and I am glad that these film packs, albeit still on the expensive side, have come down more than a third of their former price.  For now, here are my first photos with the new film stock.

All images shot with a Polaroid SX-70 on Polaroid Originals Black and White Instant Film.

 

 

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Shutter Sounds: 002

Shutter Sounds is a monthly, ten-song music playlist based upon my most-played music of the previous month.  These monthly compilations are not limited or constrained to any theme or genre.  They are simply a selection of songs that I chose from my most played artists of the month for the readers to enjoy while shooting, spending time in the darkroom, or want to listen to something new.

Shutter Sounds_002, October 2017.

YouTube: https://goo.gl/vJCK2H

Spotify: https://goo.gl/SWg45h

 

 

Part of the Process: Kent Miller

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Kent Miller

Location: New York, New York, USA

Links:

Website

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Casey Neistat, Thomas Heaton, Ben Horne, On Taking Pictures, and Art of Photography.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

I started shooting film because digital didn’t exist at the time. Processing your film was something you just did. It allowed you to experiment with your art and push things with your own vision. Spending hours in the darkroom in the early years was a different kind of high. Seeing something appear in the developer was a rush and was super exciting.

Lin Bowman working in her studio, Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, 150mm Fujinon-W lens, f6.8 @ 1sec

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

With large format film, I do a bit of portraiture and land/waterscapes.

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

5×7, 4×5, 2.25, and 35mm. Right now my go to camera is a Linhof 5×7. I shoot only black and white film. Mostly, I shoot very old stock from the 50’s. I also shoot Ilford FP4 and anything I can get my hands on.

What types of film do you develop?

I started with color film. Convinced the world is in color I never thought about anything else. Then a friend and amazing shooter talked me into buying a Monochrome Leica. I fell in love and have been obsessed with black and white since. Going back to film was a product of exploring deeper and deeper into the art. A friend in the family is also a great motivation to move your ass.

So, now I am only developing black and white films at this time. Some old, some new. Using Kodak D76, R5 monobath and Ilford developers.

Sam and Alder Zuckerman, Rafters, VT.  Linhof 5×7, Kodak Panchromatic exp. 1958, Schneider Symmar convertible lens at 210, f8 @ 1sec

What is your development process like now?

I load my film and paper in the darkroom as much as possible before going out. I take 3-4 different emulsions and papers. Some days, I use paper negatives for more contrast or a unique look to the image, other times I want super sharp and a safe film I know will look great.

I’ve been working on a portrait project using very old outdated film with great results. It’s just a risk you take to use this film. You just never know how it was stored or handled. So far, so good, though.

Jeff and Ruben, Rafters, VT. Linhof 5×7, Kodak Panchromatic exp. 1958, Schneider Symmar convertible lens at 210, f6.8 @ 1sec

I then process using one of three developers I talked about above. I then scan the negatives and pick a best shot to wet scan for digital printing. I plan to print the best shots with platinum/palladium.

I’m still working on this project so the final prints have not been made yet. I don’t really have any great tricks to offer. I’m not a master printer at all, so I just do the best I can and look to others for life long guidance. Tim Layton is amazing and I pick up anything i can from him. I’m also lucky, My great friend and now brother-in-law in an amazing alternative process guy so he is always a source of inspiration and guidance.

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

Now I develop my film and scan using a wet scanning process for the best results from my Epson V700. The negatives are also contact printed using a platinum / palladium process on watercolor paper. I also print using a digital negative with amazing results.

Katie Jo Flanagan, Dancer/Performer, White Plains, NY. Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, Schneider Symmar convertible lens at 210, f6.8 @ 4sec 

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I use many types of processing vessels. Stainless tanks, Patterson tanks and reels for roll film and 4×5.  I also picked up a beautiful tank for 5×7 sheet film made by B&W King in China. Only available through eBay, but it is a work of art in itself. I use trays for some work if I only have a sheet or two to process. I have loaded and messed up film in all the options I use, so no real one way of doing things. I have been using the stainless 5×7 tank for a lot of work lately.

Jonathan Perry, The Jugglah, Circus Arts, Hacks Point, MD, Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, Nikkor-W f8 @ 1/30

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I’ll never be content with the process as I will never be a master. I’m always learning and trying different things. A lab is not in the cards for sure but you never know about other options. I think youtube or blog type things are more in my future. Mostly just to show the things Im doing so others can offer help or info to push things in different directions.

Jim and Leroy Bowman, Elizabethtown, PA. Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, Nikkor-W f8 @ 1/15

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed?

My current work is still very new and still in its infantry. I am a commercial photographer in New York City, so I do mostly what clients need. I have yet to show any of this work yet.

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

If you have never shot film, you need to at least run a few rolls through an old camera and see what you think. If you’re searching for something with feeling, texture, and a different look than you get with digital then you may find it in film.

Michelle Kelly Wurf, Dancer, Dobbs Ferry, NY. Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, Nikkor-W f11@1/125

The cost to give it a try is not all that much, but could be a bit of a process. I would just send out a few rolls to a lab at first and see if you want to take the plunge into the art form that is film. I believe that shooting large format will slow you down and make you think differently. It’s a thought process. It’s just a box with a lens on the front but so many things can and will go wrong. When you get it right you will be amazed at the results. If you have never seen a 4×5, 5×7 or 8×10 chrome you will just sit and stare at it. It is stunning to see!

** All the film was developed in D76 straight, 7.5 min@ 70degrees, Agitation was first 30 seconds then 10 seconds every 2 minutes.  The images were scanned on an Epson V700 with a better scanning wet system. **

Reader Excerpts: DAMN

Today’s piece comes from Joe Berisford. Joe takes us on his trip to Amsterdam, a city that reinvigorates his spirit for creating images in a more simplistic fashion, focusing on things as they are.  The buzzing European city live is a polar opposite to his small town vibe back in England, which seems to drive his image creation in finding that same small town feeling by freezing moments in time in a much, much bigger city.

Reader Excerpts allow those who read Now Developing to become part of the collective by sharing a written piece alongside their images on a topic of their choice.  If you have any ideas for a piece and would like to have it featured here, feel free to contact me!

DAMN, Written by Joe Berisford (Instagram)

After stocking up on a dozen or so rolls of film, I headed to Amsterdam. Being my second time, I wanted to capture the essence of the city and leave behind the typical tourist photography in England.

Feeling inspired and ready to shoot, I was hyped as I landed at Schiphol Airport. The style of photography I normally shoot is a very documentary style (coming from a film-making background), so I always try and capture stories within the pictures I take.  Luckily, Amsterdam kept serving this moments to me on a silver platter. The first thing I noticed was that the city was ripe and alive with characters dotted everywhere. People that standout from the crowds, people that’re unique and full of personality.  I felt like I had to take advantage of this.

In many instances, I took photos that essentially created themselves.  Whilst walking along the canal side, I was asked by a friend of mine how I take a picture and the thought process behind it. I simply replied: “It’s being in the right place at the right time”.

As I said that, a man proceeded to lean against the tree with his book standing next to a beautiful vintage American muscle car. I knew before developing the film that if my trusted Olympus XA1 had captured this moment, it was going to be one of my favourite shots from the roll.  It came out exactly how I saw it in the streets. I felt like after this moment, Amsterdam kept throwing more opportunistic moments for me to record, teasing me as I knew I’d have to wait to get them developed.

On the first day, I concentrated on the people of the city and tried to capture their thoughts and feelings into a photograph. Something I’ve always found interesting is taking pictures of crowds of people and getting certain individuals to stand out, and this is something I took advantage of being in one of the busiest cities in Europe.

After shooting exclusively black and white for nearly a year, I decided to take mostly colour film to Amsterdam this time around and I’m so glad I did. After purchasing a roll of Ektar 100 in one of the side street camera shops in Central Amsterdam, I was on the hunt for the colour red.

Being Amsterdam, everybody knows about the infamous “red lights”, but that wasn’t the only red I was looking for. People really dress to impress in Amsterdam, with a sense of style and swagger everywhere you turn.  Highlighting a single colour in a picture is something I’ve found so interesting to shoot. By highlighting the colour, you’re picking up on a single person in a crowd not for how they look, not their ethnic origin, but for the colour of something they’ve got with them, and it interests me to shoot this.

After encountering a man asleep on a bench with a bright red bag I had to keep shooting. I was mainly was overexposing Ektar and underexposing Portra.  It gave me some incredible results.  After shooting people in crowds, I also love shooting subjects that’re in a lot of negative space in an image, and Amsterdam is where I’ve yielded some of my favourite photographs of all time.

Pictures like the Alien in the Window and the Girl in the Pond are some of the shots that I’ll never forget taking. After walking through the central of Amsterdam after having a bite to eat, golden hour was in full flow allowing the light to take over. After noticing the little grey dude hanging out of the window, I honestly took the picture as a bit of a meme. Getting home and seeing how the photograph turned out really made me smile and it’s one of my personal favourites from the trip.

The girl In the Pond is the only photograph featured that’s from my first trip to Amsterdam, but for me, it’s a timeless picture. The fact that this girl was so elegantly dressed and was the only one in the biggest paddling pool in the heart of Amsterdam at the time I took this picture was truly a right place at the right time moment. I’ve been slightly obsessed with this picture for nearly two years but for me, it’s a wonderful image that I’m glad I good capture.

Getting the rolls back from this trip was truly amazing for me. After planning this holiday for so long, spending time with my best mates, and capturing some of the work that I’m most proud of was a successful few days. Amsterdam is somewhere full of opportunities for timeless photographs and it allowed me to shoot in a way in which you just can’t in a small town in England.

Hopefully I’ll be turning some of the images into some prints soon and potentially a zine further down the line which I’d love to do.  But until then, I’ll keep shooting x

 

Part of the Process: Caleb Hartman

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Caleb Hartman

Location: Spring Hill, Florida, USA

Links:

Flickr

Instagram

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Anything and everything really. Japan Camera Hunter has been of interest as of late. But I also tend to regularly check out Negative Feedback, Film Photography’s Podcast, Analogue Talk Podcast, and Flickr for the o Casio al scroll-through.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

Everything about it really. The intimacy, expression, physical copies, subjectivity, philosophies attributed with, history, grain, methodical approaches, the list goes on. To put it simply, the finished product just feels well-earned. There’s more to the process than simply snapping away. Don’t get me wrong, shooting digital is wonderfully efficient in many ways, but I think there’s something a bit more in-depth and personal to be said about shooting film, and the process behind it. Slow down, step back, think twice, etc.. (for the most part). It’s a very humbling and rewarding experience.

On a side note, I’m one often to get swept up in the hustle and monotony of everyday life. I feel shooting film has really forced me to slow down, and appreciate life and it’s intricacies a bit more. It’s easy to become detached from everything around you. Kind of another reason I wanted to work with film. Necessities. It’s been a pleasant experience so far.  Minus the tourist comments.

Truthfully, I’ve always been into photography but never really pursued it; however, a couple of months ago I figured I’d need another hobby, as I often like to stay busy, and powerlifting was just too mentally and physically taxing for me to really focus on my academics at hand. Considering I basically travel around locally for work, I figured why not give photography a go. After keeping up with his blog for some time, I shot Dylan a message and enquired about where and how to start. A month later I was set up with a little Pentax ME Super, and it’s been chill ever since.

I’d say about a month after I started shooting, I was fortunate enough to come across someone selling about $300 worth of equipment for $30. This included two bulk loaders filled with TMAX, dark room data guides, empty canisters, slide film, a stainless steel tank, a few chemicals, the whole nine yards.

Needless to say, I loaded up quite a few rolls and shot all of them within the next week or so. I figured since I was storing up so much film and already had half of the equipment needed to develop the film, I might as well do a bit of research on the developing process. Ordered some chemicals a week or two later, as the ones I had received were shot, and gave it a try. I think the developing process really sealed the deal for me. I mean, not only is it relatively cost efficient, but there’s something about pulling the film off of the reel and seeing the finished product that blows you away, every time.

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

Pictures of my dog. Dogs are the best. No, I’m kidding. … sort of. Anything and everything really. If it catches my eye, I’ll shoot it. I’d like to delve into street photography a bit more, but it’s not really feasible where I’m from. Rural town, pastures, and a church on every corner, the same rhythmic patterns. You know what I’m talking about. It’s not all bad though, I guess. Ultimately, I’d like to move to a more populated place.

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

35mm strictly, at the moment. I have a Pentax ME Super, and a Canon AE-1. I’m slowly delving into the wonderful abyss that is film photography though.

What types of film do you develop?

C-41 and black and white. I’ve been meaning to jump into E6 though just for the experience, as I have a bunch of slide film laying around. All in due time.

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

YouTube, Massive Dev charts, a few forums, and the “Develop” app. My first attempt at developing film went pretty well, actually. I think the biggest struggle for me initially was making sure the temperatures for the developer and fixer were correct (shooting B&W at the time). Also, making sure everything was easily accessible and ready to be used. Everything went fairly smoothly though, despite the fact of how daunting it seemed at the start.

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I currently scan the negs straight through with an EPSON V300. It’s not the best, but for $15 it gets the job done. I think it is good for generally sharing with the world. I’d like to dive into enlarging and printing sometime in the near future too, as it seems pretty awesome.

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

Literally the budget basics. The “Develop!” app, Massive Dev charts, polyethylene terephthalate bottles, a stainless steel tank, thermometer, funnel, and a bathroom that doubles as a darkroom by sealing the frame. B&W chemicals consist of Kodak D-76, and Ilford Rapid Fixer. Water is used as the stop Bath.

For color negative film, I use FPP’s C-41 Unicolor press kit. Simple, efficient, cost-effective.

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

Never. The urge to improve is ever-present. I’ll finish developing a roll, get the negatives scanned in, and be like “Damn these are cool, but they could be better.” Ever since I’ve started shooting, I’ve seen a bit of improvement in the composition and such of each roll, though.

Developing still remains somewhat of a mystery to me, truthfully. I think it may just be an experience thing, though. I actually realized I had been over-developing my film recently. But over-developed, under-developed, art is in the eye of the beholder, right? So there’s been a lot of play in the developing times and temperatures lately. Learning the boundaries, what’s appealing, so on and so forth.

A zine would be cool! So would opening some small-time “developing lab.” Id imagine these things are a bit down the road, though.

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? 

Nothing, yet. I’ve got some personal project ideas floating around, but nothing set in stone yet.

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

Give it a go. Seriously.

Part of the Process: Alex Bolen

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Alex Bolen

Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Links:

Website

Instagram

Flickr

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Negative Feedback, Instagram, Flickr, and other Facebook groups.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

I went to school for filmmaking which introduced me to 35mm cinema cameras. I wanted to replicate the look of cinema so I picked up shooting 35mm photos. Since then, I’ve expanded to shooting medium and large format as well.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

I mainly shoot portraits, street, and lifestyle, but when traveling I love taking landscape photos.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

Large Format: Sinar 4×5

Medium Format: Mamiya RB67

35mm: Nikon 35ti, Canon AE1

Instant: Polaroid Landcamera 340

Film: HP5 @ 400 & 800, Lomography 400 & 800, Portra 400, Fuji FP100c

What types of film do you develop?

C41 and black and white.

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

The first time I developed film was kind of a whirlwind. I didn’t know much about it, but since all my local shops closed down, I wanted to be able to do it myself. I gave a half-hearted Google search on how to do it, picked up some used supplies on eBay and set up shop in my dad’s dental lab. I followed the steps laid out in a Youtube video and to my surprise, I pulled out my film and found images on it. Half amazed and half confused that I did everything correctly, I quickly bought a bigger developing tank and have been doing all of my own film ever since.

Minolta 140EX // Lomography Color 400

What is your development process like now?

My current process starts with my loading all of my film onto reels in my darkroom after shooting and placing them in the developing tanks. I find it much easier to change film in a darkroom than a changing bag. My hands don’t get all sweaty and I have much more space to work.

From here I bring them over to my dad’s dental lab where I keep all of my developing chemicals and supplies. I follow a pretty standard developing process and do a final rinse with distilled water and Photo-Flo to make sure my negatives are squeaky clean.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

After my film is dry, I load them into protective sleeves and scan them in on my Epson V600. After I have digital files I run them through Lightroom where I remove dust, tweak colors, and add a little contrast.

My process is pretty straight forward and “by the books.” Although I am quite lazy with developing times and my schedule is a bit sloppy, everything tends to turn out okay.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I built a darkroom in my studio for around $400 about a year ago. I started shooting a lot of black and white and found a couple darkroom bundles on Craigslist for cheap that had everything I needed. I’ve been printing my own 35mm black and white since then and have been enjoying the process immensely. There’s something surreal about doing everything from taking the actual photo, to developing, to printing it and holding a final product in my hands.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I use a Paterson tank with Kodak D-76 developer for my black and white and Unicolor chemicals for C41. Honestly, I just bought what had the best reviews on Amazon and haven’t looked back since, haha. They’ve both worked swimmingly and I don’t feel as though I need to improve on a well oiled system as of right now.

Canon AF35ML // Agfa Vista 200

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I don’t think I’m ever content with any art venture. There’s always something more – something new that I want to try or accomplish. This year I’d love to release a very limited run zine or book with some of my work, as well as try to put on an exhibition of my landscapes I plan on taking this summer. Other than that, I just plan on exploring some new locations and trying out some new films.

Minolta 140EX // Lomography Color 400

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? 

Photography is still just a hobby for me at the moment and I haven’t really looked to do anything beyond taking photos for my own enjoyment. I recently just finished up a collaborative zine with a small film pod I’m a part of on Instagram (Space Pod), and this summer I’m looking to take some 4×5 landscapes of Northern Michigan to sell out of my uncle’s art gallery.

Other than that, I enjoy sharing my photos with friends via Instagram.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

To everyone interested in shooting/developing film but are apprehensive – GO DO IT! It’s a very strange leap and is going to take a lot of trial and error, but the beauty of the art is that it’s all about the journey along the way. You’ll learn a ton and really get to see life through a different perspective. Sure, it costs a little money, but it’s worth it. Money’s just a tool – so use it on something that’s going to build your character and leave a legacy.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

Reader Excerpts: Forty Eight Hours in Tennessee

Today’s piece comes from Ryan Berger. Ryan tells us about his humble beginning in photography; fast forwarding through his digital cameras, our friendship that has been cemented through photography, and his new-found love for his Fuji GA645zi that breathes new life into his creative expression and hobby to record his daily life.

Reader Excerpts allow those who read Now Developing to become part of the collective by sharing a written piece alongside their images on a topic of their choice.  If you are working on a project, would like to display some of your work, explain your creative process, or have any other prospective ideas for a personal perspective piece and would like to have it featured here, feel free to contact me!

Forty Eight Hours in Tennessee, Written by Ryan Berger (Blog, Instagram)

Forty Eight Hours in Tennessee

I remember my grandmother’s love of disposable cameras. Growing up, every trip we went on, we packed a 10 pack of those cameras so my grandmother could snap away and gather the memories that defined our family vacations. I thought it was silly at the time, and always got a kick out of the developed images – 80% of them including her thumb in the corner of the frame. She’d always throw me a few, and I would take pictures and then always be excited to see how they turned out as we waited to get the developed film and prints back from Walgreens.

Looking back now, even as imperfect as those images are, they’re super meaningful and they make me remember things that I’d otherwise forget. It’s not that the photos are anything special (Sorry, Grandma, but those cameras are really terrible), but they’re real. Capturing the everyday moments that otherwise get filtered out by the constant fire-fighting we do in our lives. I never really thought about it until I sit down to write this up, but without a doubt, her style of photography, inspired me. A simple goal: to try and capture my life through a lens: my everyday life.

I remember asking my mom for a digital camera when I was 14. We were getting ready to move to a new town and I wanted a hobby other than video games. She got me a Canon PowerShot ELPH, a very simple digital point and shoot. Honestly, I think it was 3 megapixels. I loved that camera, it went everywhere with me and I took pictures of everything. This continued on until I got to the point where I felt like I wanted to pursue photography more seriously and move into shooting with a DSLR. For my 18th birthday, I ended up with a Nikon D40, and the kit. I met Dylan about 10 years ago, through our current admiration for edgy streetwear brands and photography alike. Still shooting with the D40, but using a 35mm prime lens. We both lived in the same town where it was hard to make friends, even harder to make ones that shared similar interests. We grew up together, taking photos. The cameras we shot with changed, but we always took pictures. I stuck with digital, moving to a full frame system to shoot some menswear-fashion work for a blog I was running at the time. As the commissioned work kept coming in, I got more and more tired and burnt out of taking photos for personal enjoyment.

After starting to feel myself lose interest in photography, I decided to switch back to a pocketable point and shoot, a Ricoh GR digital. This camera brought my heart back into photography, and made me want to go out and just walk around the city and take pictures of whatever caught my eye.

Me and Dylan got an idea to show some work at a coffee shop in our city, and it was a huge success. Everything I showed was from this tiny camera that was always in my pocket. I loved the idea of that. That I could make images that people enjoyed from a camera like the GR. It was simple. Just a 28mm 2.8 lens, no fancy glass or interchangeable lenses needed.

After three years of shooting with the Ricoh, and seeing my work alongside Dylan’s, I could always see the difference of medium format, the unexplainable depth that the photos had, compared to a digital sensor. Ever since Dylan had made the switch to just film, I was always inspired by the process and the end result as well. Finally, I showed an interest in trying out a film camera and after a pretty quick conversation, decided on a Fujifilm GA645zi. It was the perfect gateway from digital to film that fit my shooting style: a medium format camera, but still a simplistic enough for my personal shooting style.

Quickly going through a roll of film the day the camera arrived from across the pond from Japan, I was anxious to see the results. Without a doubt, I knew there would be a learning curve. No on-screen focus confirmation, no 7-shot burst on the same subject, and most importantly — no instant gratification. Just a quick look to see if my lens cap was off, and the hope that I focused on the right distance. It was weird not being able to get home, move over 30 photos, pick 10 of them, edit, and post them to Instagram right away. I liked that feeling though, I had to slow down and really think about the things I took pictures of and how I composed the shot. This camera made me be careful with photography, but in the best way. It’s quirky, and I’m still learning to embrace those quirks, but I’m stoked.

Getting back that first roll, despite forgetting to take the lens cap off for a few photos, was such an amazing feeling. I always take photos to remember a feeling I’m having, so that whenever I look at that, I can go back and remember why I took it to begin with. This hasn’t changed in my transition to film, but the internal result for me was amplified by seeing my photos in a new format and essentially a new medium all together.

I don’t know all of the film lingo, as this is all extremely new to me, but the tones that came through just blew me away. Gradient coloring like I’d never seen in my digital photos, and image depth that I think surpasses a full frame sensor in its own right. I was sold, so sold that I told myself I should just shoot film for a few months and learn this new world inside and out.

Shortly after those first two rolls, I had a quick weekend trip to Nashville upcoming. Camping in the mountains with my girlfriend, and then just spending a day in the city. With the decision already made to just shoot film for a while, I stocked up on some Portra 400 and Ektar 100, crossing my fingers that I wouldn’t take a bunch of blurry, improperly exposed, or out of focus photos.

Out of the 4 rolls I shot, I took 3 photos with the lens cap on, 13 photos that were either blurry or underexposed, and 48 usable photos. Out of those usable photos, I loved all of them. Unlike my easy to throwaway digital photos, to me, these were all great photos, even with their imperfections. Whenever I look at them, I’m taken back to how I felt the second the shutter clicked. From taking the photos, having them developed, scanning them in, and then proofing them, it was just a really great feeling to see the images come to life. I’m excited to continue down this road, learn as I go, and hopefully make some really rad photos in the process.

All photos were taken using a Fuji GA645zi on Portra 400

Now Developing on With a Camera Podcast

Literally just hours before Hurricane Irma came to visit us here in Florida a couple weeks ago, I got a chance to sit down and talk with Kristen of the With a Camera Podcast (and blog, too!).

In this episode, we got to talk about my photographic process, my influences, and what drives my photographic intentions.  It was really nice to sit back and have a relaxed talk that allowed me to reflect on why and how I make photographs.  Of course, we touch on many other things related to film photography as well.

The episode can be listened to here:

Thanks to Kristen!  Enjoy!

Reader Excerpts: Somewhere Between Waking and Sleeping

Today’s visual-narrative piece comes from Michael Ivnitsky. Michael shares a project entitled “Somewhere Between Waking and Sleeping.” A documentary of his time while transitioning back to life in Tel Aviv explores and visualizes his struggles with insomnia and the constant battle to keep the wheels beneath him moving while transitioning between the dynamics of two very different cities.  

Reader Excerpts allow those who read Now Developing to become part of the collective by sharing a written piece alongside their images on a topic of their choice.  If you have any ideas for a piece and would like to have it featured here, feel free to contact me!

Somewhere Between Waking and Sleeping, shot and written by Michael Ivnitsky (Website, Instagram, Blog)

This project was birthed upon my return to Tel Aviv after living in Dublin for 18 months. I moved to Dublin for a while after growing tired and emotionally drained of Israel.

Tel Aviv is an intense and polarizing place, especially after the sleepy and polite city of Dublin.  While in Dublin, the first six months were filled with insomnia, visiting old friends and meeting new people, finding old places I liked (closed or worse, changed), and being dragged to places I don’t know.  Generally this consisted of trying to get accustomed to the killer pace of working hard whilst partying harder with an occasional visit to an island for serenity.

This majority of this project was shot with a Leica M4 and 35mm Summicron f/2 on Foma Creative 200, developed in D-76 1+1 for 9min @ 20c.  Other shots were taken using a Nikon EM with a 50mm f/1.8 E.