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Part of the Process: Sadie Bailey

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Sadie Bailey

Location: London & Los Angeles

Links:

Instagram

Website

Project Upcoming

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Matt Day on YouTube, @inverse.collective and @ilfordphoto on Instagram.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

The tangible, “forever” aspect of film has always interested me. I have a contact sheets from my childhood that family friends have shot when we were in NYC and that was always the coolest thing to me. I’m extremely sentimental, probably too sentimental at times, so being able to document my life so purely was just natural instinct, really. I’ve been shooting film on and off for years, but it always seemed extremely pricey when I was younger. Now that I’m older, and run my own publishing company / online magazine, am I able to really dive into the art of it all.

Contax G1 w/ 28mm Biogon // Ilford HP5 +1

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

People! Not necessarily portraits as such. Much more “lifestyle”. A lot of my work is based around skateboarding, surfing, music & nightlife photography. However, when I’m in LA I do tend to explore the more street / landscape photography approach because I feel like the atmosphere there is extremely beautiful. I just shot a project where I skated up and down Sunset Blvd photographing buildings and landmarks that spark childhood nostalgia.

Nikon FE2 w/ 50mm 1.8 // Ilford HP5 +1

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

I shoot mainly 35mm, but I dabble with Medium Format (120) in my studio from time to time. I’ve tested out a range of cameras from Canon EOS 10, Contax T2 & 139Q, multiple Olympus Mju ii’s and various different off brand SLRs but I’m currently settled with a Nikon FE2 (accompanied by a Nikkor 50 1.8) and a Contax G1 (with the beautiful Carl Zeiss G Series T* 28 mm f/2.8 Biogon). For 120- I’ve messed around with a Yashica Mat 124g and have access to a Hasselblad when I’m in LA but I only own a little Holga 120GCFN. It’s a little plastic toy camera, with very limited features / settings but the glass lens captures off some great photographs with the right lighting.

Contax G1 w/ 28mm Biogon // Ilford HP5 +1

As for film, I usually only shoot Ilford HP5 pushed +1 but will happily use some Tri-X (at box speed) if that’s laying about. Ilford Delta 400 is great in 120, the grain is beautiful. I very rarely shoot colour, I mainly avoid it completely unless I’m being commissioned to do so. If that’s the case, I’ll go for Fuji Superia 400 during the day & Kodak Ultramax 400 at night with flash.

Nikon FE2 w/ 50mm 1.8 // Ilford HP5 +1

What types of film do you develop?

Black and white only. I don’t shoot enough colour to get into the development process, however I have an untouched roll of Velvia 100 on my desk so maybe I’ll test my luck with E6 if I get bored.

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

Oh damn. I was a few cups of coffee in, completely overwhelmed after watching video after video on YouTube. I’ve taught myself everything I know about photography so it’s always very trial and error to start off with.

Nikon FE2 w/ 50mm 1.8 // Ilford HP5 +1

I had the chemicals and all the equipment sitting in my office for months, with a roll just sat in tank, before I decided to give it a shot. I was so excited to finally start developing that when I got to the wet sink in my office I dove straight into the process without bringing all of my notes with me. I completely forgot what dilution and measurements I needed for my stop bath & fixer and stupidly ended up dumping half bottle of both into the tank instead. Needless to say, I fucked that roll up.

What is your development process like now?

 

My workflow process differs drastically depending on what I’m shooting. I can shoot 10 rolls in one night and have them developed in 2 days, or over 2 months and then another few weeks for developing. The only thing that stays the same is that as soon as I finish a roll, I write what it is that I’ve shot, whether I pushed or not, and then whack it straight into the fridge until ready for developing.

I also like to experiment with alternative processes, such as cyanotype, van dyke brown, or photographic emulsion, among many others. Alternative processes are really interesting to me but I haven’t got the time to work with them as much as I want. I hope I can work more with them in the future!

Nikon FE2 w/ 50mm 1.8 // Ilford HP5 +1

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I only scan, unfortunately. I don’t have the space to set up a full darkroom so wet printing is out of the question right now. Saying that, a new community darkroom just opened up in Portland, Oregon so when I’m there later this year I’m going to book a session and start printing my negatives for an upcoming exhibition I’m working on.

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I have everything listed under Parallax Photographic Coop’s film processing shopping list (you can find that list here). I trust them with all of my photographic needs and queries.

Contax G1 w/ 28mm Biogon // Ilford HP5 +1

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I’m currently in the process of two big projects: one is a community-based project in honour of my friend who sadly took his own life a few weeks back. I’ve joined forces with my friend, and fellow photographer, Ollie Murphy and set to create a book that opens up a conversation of Mental Health. We’re photographing people in my studio and asking them to share their experiences in what we hope to be an open, honest and safe platform. On a more positive note, I’m in the midst (and soon getting back to) shooting my biggest body of work yet. It’s entitled Endless Summer and hopefully will release as an exhibition with all the photographs being shot, developed and printed by myself.

Ilford Delta 400

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? 

All my projects that I’ve ever executed have been shot on film. I’ve never had the desire to try out digital photography. There’s nothing wrong with it- It’s just not for me. I just published a new zine, entitled “We Only Hate the World Monday – Friday”, along with recently shooting for Nike SB and having a 6 page feature in Wasted Talent Magazine.

Contax G1 w/ 28mm Biogon // Ilford HP5 +1

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

I said this in a recent interview, but I’m happy to reiterate. Stop shooting “party” photos on a cheap point & shoot with Agfa 200. Spend your time thinking of projects you want to work on, and motivate yourself to do so.

Contax G1 w/ 28mm Biogon // Ilford HP5 +1

Do you do anything else that you believe is unique to your process but may not be addressed in the previous questions?
I think shooting for yourself (and not for Instagram likes) is, sadly, becoming a unique process in modern day film photography.
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Part of the Process: Eric Löfgen

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Eric Löfgen

Location: St. Vith, Belgium

Links:

Flickr

Instagram

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Petapixel, Lomography, ishootfilm, and Matt Day on Youtube.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

I never really was interested in photography, I was more into music during my youth. Sometimes, my best friend took his camera to our rehearsals and he shot some pictures of us. What I really liked about that, was that two months later he showed us the shots. I was used to that when I was a kid because of my parents, but seeing this years later fascinated me.

A few months later, I contacted another friend who was into photography, to give me a quick lesson about exposure and all that. He gave me his Pentax and I took some shots. After that it took me almost a year until I purchased my first own 35mm camera. It was a Yashica MG1 that I found at the flea market. I still had some troubles shooting because the exposure was fixed to around 1/60s and I didn’t like rangefinders at the time.

Another two or three months later, an old friend contacted me. His grandfather died and they found his old photo gear in the attic. It was a Canon AE-1 with a 50mm, a 28mm and a 80-200mm. I immediately bought it and I’ve never regretted that decision. I started shooting more and more, mostly landscapes.

But I was still learning, I shot a few rolls who were completely underexposed. I wanted it too fast — so I started to teach myself more about exposures and ISO. After that, I was in a buying rush, everything I saw on flea markets had to be mine. I got into developing at home, because my local development spot charged me about 24€/roll, which was really expensive because I was shooting a lot more by this time.

I started with a Adonal black and white starter set. The next evening, I developed my first roll. The pictures were bad, but the feeling while pulling the film out of the spool was unmatched. Seeing that I nailed it was a great feeling. Half a year after that I started with C41-color development.

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

I mostly shoot portraits at the moment. To me, portraits are the best way to capture feelings.

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

I’m shooting a few 35mm cameras: Canon A1 & AE1 and a Rollei 35s.  I use my 35mm for action shots like concerts and skateboarding. They allow to jump in and take the shot because they are a bit more handy. They are more of  a snapshot camera to me, if needed.

For medium format, I am using a Yashica Mat 124.  I’ve been forcing myself to shoot only with my Yashica Mat 124 this past summer, to learn more about the camera and to slow down a bit more. I’m using this camera mostly for portraits and landscapes. It allows me to think about what I am about to shoot.

I am also shooting Polaroids using a Polaroid EE66.  My polaroid camera is just for fun. It is mostly used on evenings combined with drinking with friends.

I’m still looking for my favorite film, but I am currently shooting Kodak Portra series, Ilford HP5, Ilford Delta 400, and Fuji-100.

What types of film do you develop?

C41 and black and white.

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

I remember my first roll quite well. It was a 120 roll of Ilford FP+. It was actually kind of a risk. I never did the spooling with a medium format film and I wanted to try this the first time in complete darkness. It took me half an hour until I got the film into the spool and at the end, I wasn’t even sure if it was right. During this half hour I thought “What the fuck? Why am I even doing this? This is nuts! You won’t succeed!”. When I turned the light on, I proved myself correct because I mistook the backing paper for the negative. Beginner fail.

I did some research on the internet and everyone was saying something different. I read many blogs, watched many youtube videos. To be honest, I did not expect any results. So many ways, and so many different times to develop film.  I just didn’t know where to start. But when I opened the tank and I saw something, I realized that I did it. I developed my first roll of film!

What is your development process like now?

At first, I’m shooting some rolls until I have enough film in my fridge. After that I start developing. When everything is dry, I start scanning. Mostly with a good beer, because it takes forever. After scanning I’m archiving the rolls.

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I scan all film myself with a Canon 9000F Mark II. Not the best scanner in the game, but it’s alright. I’ve bought an enlarger on eBay, did some prints but I didn’t find the time yet to really get into it.

Sometimes I’m developing with friends. These evenings are special to me. We’re both creating something this evening. Drinking a beer during and talk about life. This is something unique that I really enjoy about my process.

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I’m using the paterson beginner set with Paterson 35mm and medium format tank with Adonal black and white chemicals. I’m using the Tetenal C41 for color. I did not choose a special brand, the monetary offer just was simply attractive to me.

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I’m still looking for my way in this world. I’m currently trying to improve my development process. I’m also trying to shoot more with models/people I don’t know. That’s something I’m afraid of but I’m ready to try something new. I always learn by doing, so that’s something I have to do.

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? 

I just started my first project called a summer on 6×6. The concept is very simple. I shoot my Yashica Mat124 all summer and develop them come Autumn. Maybe I’ll do some prints, or maybe even a book. We’ll see. I have some other projects planned for the coming years.

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

Try it and don’t be afraid of failing! Failing is normal but you’ll learn from it! You will love it.  Take notes, get into you own rhythm, never stop learning, watch youtube videos, try different techniques … Don’t let anyone stress you. Shooting is my way of relaxing. It allows me to slow down in this stressful world 🙂

Part of the Process: Chris Moore

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Chris Moore

Location: Springfield, MO

Links:

Pinterest

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

The Phoblographer, PetaPixel, Film Photographers group on Facebook, YouTube, and Pinterest.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

Originally, my dad was into photography so as a child it seemed like there were always negatives and prints laying around, and there was always a camera somewhere. I didn’t really get too much into shooting myself until my early 20’s. After a while, film processing was starting to get a bit expensive, so I invested in a good scanner and decided to do it myself with black and white film (at the time, it was the cheapest and easiest thing to do).

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

Landscapes, flowers, street, and urban scenes, and also very unusual objects. To find beauty in the mundane is part of what makes photography such a blast of a hobby for me, personally.

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

I shoot a good mix of both 35mm film and digital.  For 35mm, I have a Canon EOS Rebel 2000 that I have used since 1999 for both color and black and white. Not long ago, I inherited a Pentax Spotmatic with assorted lenses (50mm, 100mm, 28mm) purchased by my father while serving in the Marines in Japan in the early 60’s along with a newer Pentax MV with the standard prime 50mm SMC lens. For its historic value I have tried not to use the Spotmatic too much, but I got an adapter ring to use the M42 lenses with the newer K mount, so I am letting the MV be the workhorse camera between the two.

For film there is nothing like the faithful Canon.  Although, as of late, I have really enjoyed the Pentax MV.  So in terms of preference, it’s a toss up. Manual focusing has proven much more difficult than one might think, but the focusing screen helps a great deal.

Canon Rebel 2000 with 28-55mm // TMax 400

What types of film do you develop?

Traditionally I have always developed Kodak TMax or Ilford films in liquid Kodak TMax developer concentrate, although as of late they charge so much extra shipping for liquids that I have switched to D-76 powder.  Man, have I ever been missing out. D-76 is way better in my opinion, but to each their own. I have done that for many years.

Last night, for the first time ever, I developed a roll of C-41 using the most common Unicolor kit sold on several sites. The results were by no means perfect (a second blix may be in order) but still very encouraging and promising, and there is nothing like the feeling of pulling film off your reel and seeing color images. It was an experience that encourages me to try it again and keep going with it. As I told my wife – “that was the best 15 minutes of my photographic life.”

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

The first developing experience ever with any kind of film goes all the way back to 1999 when I did my first roll of black and white. There was so much I wanted to try and do and I wanted to be able to shoot my photos, bring them home and work with them without the hassle of making a trip to a lab to get them developed and part with perfectly good cash.

I had practiced loading the reel several times and that helped, though I got in the changing bag and I used a bottle opener to get the film can opened up and I must have fumbled around for an hour to just get it threaded. Lesson learned – cut the film tongue off, it’s much easier to load after that! I got my tank loaded and poured in clear developer mixed from Kodak TMax liquid (at the time I found powder to be very daunting). A few minutes later, I found myself pouring out amber-colored fluid and I was excited — the development must have worked. I went on and rinsed and fixed. The moment of truth came and I pulled the negative off the reel enough to look – and there was an image there! I had done it, and the development had worked flawlessly. I had but to rinse, dry and scan. That was all it took to get me hooked. Digital is nice and very convenient, but there’s still something very enjoyable about the physical aspect of film and chemistry.  There’s something nice about having a tangible result of your efforts that can’t be had with digital.

The first experience with color film was actually very recent. For the longest time, I never thought color (C-41 or E-6) was very economical or practical to do at home due to chemistry cost and very short shelf life. More recently, I’ve seen on sites and blogs where people are doing C-41 at home and it actually doesn’t cost very much at all with a very decent shelf life.

I took the plunge and decided to try it on a roll of Fuji Superia ISO 200 film – a WalMart standard and a film that I have had good luck with in the past with pictures. I expected it to smell much worse, but actually there was very little odor left over. It was different working with hot liquids rather than room temperature liquids but it actually was not that much more difficult. My results were by no means perfect – a bit of a brown tinge on some frames and a slightly darker than normal orange mask make me think that a second blix may be in order.  But still, the results were not bad at all and I yielded a few good looking positive images. Very promising results and good enough to encourage me to try again and keep going with this. There’s lots of fun and creativity yet to be tapped into with C-41 processing.

What is your development process like now?

1) In the case of film, shoot a roll of the stock of choice in the camera body of choice.

2) If using my Pentax MV, I rewind the film just until I can hear the tongue break away from the spool. Then opening the camera, I have an exposed film leader, so it’s easy to get my reel started in the light and then put it in the bag to get it loaded the rest of the way. In the case of Canon, I shoot it until there’s 1 frame left, then open it up for that same reason. Granted, that’s not the most efficient use of film because a couple of frames do get lost, but that’s a lot easier than doing it all in darkness. Aside from that with sites like ultra fine online there’s no excuse to pay high prices for film and chemistry.

3) After the negatives are dry, I scan in 16-bit TIFF format so I am left with the rough equivalent of a digital camera RAW file and then import it into GIMP, at which time I invert my negative, adjust exposure, fix up the color, desaturate for black and white images, and then export to a JPEG to be sent off to either my Pinterest page or the film photographers Facebook page.

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I primarily scan. I have a Pacific Imaging PrimeFilm 1800u scanner that I bought in 1999 that I still use and it still performs quite well. Astoundingly, it’s still available on Amazon.  I can scan negatives as transparent images, the reason being that the software along with the scanner is quite old and it’s better to just scan it as is, than use newer software (in my case the latest GIMP version) to invert, color correct (or desaturate), and beautify.

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I have a standard issue changing bag, Patterson universal development tank, D-76 developer and hardening fixer in the case of black and white.  I use the Unicolor C-41 kit in the case of color.  Additionally, I have some pyrex measuring cups, a graduated cylinder, and a bathroom where it all takes place.

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

As mentioned, I just began my journey into color development and I really want to keep going with that. I also do not want to give up black and white film and I don’t want to replace film with digital by any means. I think both formats have their own value. I don’t really have business plans.  And as far as publishing goes, I would just like my Pinterest board to be seen by anybody who wants to look at it.

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

In this day and age it’s never been easier or cheaper to get into film photography. Film SLR cameras can be had amazingly cheap (in some cases free if you have older family members that embrace technology and happen to like you). Film, chemistry and development gear are also quite inexpensive and quite fulfilling as well. If you’re apprehensive, there’s really no reason to be!

Part of the Process: Sara G. Amo

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Sara G. Amo

Location: From Barcelona, Spain, but currently living in Iceland

Links:

Cargo Collective

Tumblr

Facebook

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

I like to wander around Tumblr to find other photographers and inspiration.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

What attracted me the most are the aesthetics of film and the whole artisanal value of the process of developing. I discovered film when I was studying graphic design, we had a photography class and the first year was all about film photography, so we learned to shoot with film cameras and develop our negatives and prints. After that, when I became more focused in photography, I started shooting and developing by myself at the same time.

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

I shoot mostly portraits, but also landscape. I am very interested in human emotions, the connection between humans and nature, and also in the social documentary perspective.

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

I use mostly 35mm and medium format. I like 35mm because it’s the most easy to bring when traveling, or when going out in the street or hiking in the mountains.  It’s light weight, and you have a lot of photographs in every roll. But actually, my favorite format is medium format, I love the depth of the negatives; the results are amazing both in portrait and landscape photography. But it’s also more difficult to use because the camera is a lot heavier and the rolls have less photographs.

So, I often use the 35mm when I’m shooting on my own, and the medium format when I have to work on specific projects.

What types of film do you develop?

At home, I develop black and white, both negatives and prints. In the future, I would like to be able to also develop C41.

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

I already had the basics of developing because I learned it at school, but I remember the first time I decided to do it at home, totally by myself alone, and I felt kind of scared of making some mistake and ruining the whole batch of work. But in the end, everything went well and the more I developed, the more confidence I gained to continue doing it.

What is your development process like now?

First, I decide what format or camera I am gonna use depending on the project, after the shooting, I normally don’t develop the rolls until I have many to develop them in a batch.

I send the color film to the lab, also when I have quite a lot of them. After I have all the negatives, I scan them at home and make a selection. Then, I edit the final ones in photoshop, just the basic touches: brightness, contrast, color dominance, and not much more than that. When I have money and I can buy photographic paper, I enlarge some of my favorite black and white prints in the darkroom and scan the final print instead of the negatives.

I also like to experiment with alternative processes, such as cyanotype, van dyke brown, or photographic emulsion, among many others. Alternative processes are really interesting to me but I haven’t got the time to work with them as much as I want. I hope I can work more with them in the future!

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I like to do everything by myself. The first thing I did when I got my latest job was buy a professional scanner so I can scan all my negatives at home, because the prices of the laboratory were too high and I also didn’t like the quality of it.

I enlarge and print my black and white photographs in the darkroom, but lately I can’t do it much because of the cost of the photographic paper. But when I have an exhibition, I always do it, the quality of the prints is much better when you develop them in the darkroom.

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I don’t have a fixed darkroom. I would love to have it in the future, but for now I have to use my bathroom (I call it the “bathlab”). I use a Meopta Opemus 6a enlarger and a Paterson tank, because I bought it all together from a friend that was selling all of her darkroom equipment.

Currently, I use Kodak HC-110 as a film developer because I love the results in all the films that I’ve tried, the contrast and tones that you get are perfect, and also because it lasts for a long long time. The rest of the chemicals, including fixer, stop bath and paper developer are from Tetenal, mostly because they are the ones that are more easy to find here and the price isn’t too expensive.

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I feel that I am still in the beginning of the journey. I still have to shoot a lot more, I still have to develop a lot of projects that I have in my mind and spread my works so they reach more people. I realized that my way is slow, so everything goes little by little, but the best I can do is enjoy the process, go with the flow, and see what happens next!

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? 

I’m currently finishing some projects that I shot in the last years, organizing all the photographs and making the final selections. This is always the most difficult part of the projects for me, mainly because it’s very time consuming and I have to spend many hours on the computer.  I prefer to be shooting outside or developing in the darkroom.

My latest finished project that you can find online in my portfolio is ‘A dor da ausencia’, regarding the loss of my grandmother Ilda, probably one of the most special and difficult projects that I’ve done up until now.

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

Don’t be afraid, start in the most simple way: just find a film camera (ask your family if they have any old cameras or buy a second hand one), buy the cheapest film that you find, and start shooting!

Developing B&W at home is very easy, you just have to learn the basics and start experimenting. You’ll discover a whole new world that will let you experiment photography in many different ways. Don’t worry if you make mistakes at first, keep shooting and practicing, that is the key to grow and improve!

 

Part of the Process: Kent Miller

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Kent Miller

Location: New York, New York, USA

Links:

Website

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Casey Neistat, Thomas Heaton, Ben Horne, On Taking Pictures, and Art of Photography.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

I started shooting film because digital didn’t exist at the time. Processing your film was something you just did. It allowed you to experiment with your art and push things with your own vision. Spending hours in the darkroom in the early years was a different kind of high. Seeing something appear in the developer was a rush and was super exciting.

Lin Bowman working in her studio, Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, 150mm Fujinon-W lens, f6.8 @ 1sec

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

With large format film, I do a bit of portraiture and land/waterscapes.

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

5×7, 4×5, 2.25, and 35mm. Right now my go to camera is a Linhof 5×7. I shoot only black and white film. Mostly, I shoot very old stock from the 50’s. I also shoot Ilford FP4 and anything I can get my hands on.

What types of film do you develop?

I started with color film. Convinced the world is in color I never thought about anything else. Then a friend and amazing shooter talked me into buying a Monochrome Leica. I fell in love and have been obsessed with black and white since. Going back to film was a product of exploring deeper and deeper into the art. A friend in the family is also a great motivation to move your ass.

So, now I am only developing black and white films at this time. Some old, some new. Using Kodak D76, R5 monobath and Ilford developers.

Sam and Alder Zuckerman, Rafters, VT.  Linhof 5×7, Kodak Panchromatic exp. 1958, Schneider Symmar convertible lens at 210, f8 @ 1sec

What is your development process like now?

I load my film and paper in the darkroom as much as possible before going out. I take 3-4 different emulsions and papers. Some days, I use paper negatives for more contrast or a unique look to the image, other times I want super sharp and a safe film I know will look great.

I’ve been working on a portrait project using very old outdated film with great results. It’s just a risk you take to use this film. You just never know how it was stored or handled. So far, so good, though.

Jeff and Ruben, Rafters, VT. Linhof 5×7, Kodak Panchromatic exp. 1958, Schneider Symmar convertible lens at 210, f6.8 @ 1sec

I then process using one of three developers I talked about above. I then scan the negatives and pick a best shot to wet scan for digital printing. I plan to print the best shots with platinum/palladium.

I’m still working on this project so the final prints have not been made yet. I don’t really have any great tricks to offer. I’m not a master printer at all, so I just do the best I can and look to others for life long guidance. Tim Layton is amazing and I pick up anything i can from him. I’m also lucky, My great friend and now brother-in-law in an amazing alternative process guy so he is always a source of inspiration and guidance.

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

Now I develop my film and scan using a wet scanning process for the best results from my Epson V700. The negatives are also contact printed using a platinum / palladium process on watercolor paper. I also print using a digital negative with amazing results.

Katie Jo Flanagan, Dancer/Performer, White Plains, NY. Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, Schneider Symmar convertible lens at 210, f6.8 @ 4sec 

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I use many types of processing vessels. Stainless tanks, Patterson tanks and reels for roll film and 4×5.  I also picked up a beautiful tank for 5×7 sheet film made by B&W King in China. Only available through eBay, but it is a work of art in itself. I use trays for some work if I only have a sheet or two to process. I have loaded and messed up film in all the options I use, so no real one way of doing things. I have been using the stainless 5×7 tank for a lot of work lately.

Jonathan Perry, The Jugglah, Circus Arts, Hacks Point, MD, Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, Nikkor-W f8 @ 1/30

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I’ll never be content with the process as I will never be a master. I’m always learning and trying different things. A lab is not in the cards for sure but you never know about other options. I think youtube or blog type things are more in my future. Mostly just to show the things Im doing so others can offer help or info to push things in different directions.

Jim and Leroy Bowman, Elizabethtown, PA. Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, Nikkor-W f8 @ 1/15

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed?

My current work is still very new and still in its infantry. I am a commercial photographer in New York City, so I do mostly what clients need. I have yet to show any of this work yet.

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

If you have never shot film, you need to at least run a few rolls through an old camera and see what you think. If you’re searching for something with feeling, texture, and a different look than you get with digital then you may find it in film.

Michelle Kelly Wurf, Dancer, Dobbs Ferry, NY. Linhof 5×7, Ilford HP5, Nikkor-W f11@1/125

The cost to give it a try is not all that much, but could be a bit of a process. I would just send out a few rolls to a lab at first and see if you want to take the plunge into the art form that is film. I believe that shooting large format will slow you down and make you think differently. It’s a thought process. It’s just a box with a lens on the front but so many things can and will go wrong. When you get it right you will be amazed at the results. If you have never seen a 4×5, 5×7 or 8×10 chrome you will just sit and stare at it. It is stunning to see!

** All the film was developed in D76 straight, 7.5 min@ 70degrees, Agitation was first 30 seconds then 10 seconds every 2 minutes.  The images were scanned on an Epson V700 with a better scanning wet system. **

Part of the Process: Caleb Hartman

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Caleb Hartman

Location: Spring Hill, Florida, USA

Links:

Flickr

Instagram

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Anything and everything really. Japan Camera Hunter has been of interest as of late. But I also tend to regularly check out Negative Feedback, Film Photography’s Podcast, Analogue Talk Podcast, and Flickr for the o Casio al scroll-through.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

Everything about it really. The intimacy, expression, physical copies, subjectivity, philosophies attributed with, history, grain, methodical approaches, the list goes on. To put it simply, the finished product just feels well-earned. There’s more to the process than simply snapping away. Don’t get me wrong, shooting digital is wonderfully efficient in many ways, but I think there’s something a bit more in-depth and personal to be said about shooting film, and the process behind it. Slow down, step back, think twice, etc.. (for the most part). It’s a very humbling and rewarding experience.

On a side note, I’m one often to get swept up in the hustle and monotony of everyday life. I feel shooting film has really forced me to slow down, and appreciate life and it’s intricacies a bit more. It’s easy to become detached from everything around you. Kind of another reason I wanted to work with film. Necessities. It’s been a pleasant experience so far.  Minus the tourist comments.

Truthfully, I’ve always been into photography but never really pursued it; however, a couple of months ago I figured I’d need another hobby, as I often like to stay busy, and powerlifting was just too mentally and physically taxing for me to really focus on my academics at hand. Considering I basically travel around locally for work, I figured why not give photography a go. After keeping up with his blog for some time, I shot Dylan a message and enquired about where and how to start. A month later I was set up with a little Pentax ME Super, and it’s been chill ever since.

I’d say about a month after I started shooting, I was fortunate enough to come across someone selling about $300 worth of equipment for $30. This included two bulk loaders filled with TMAX, dark room data guides, empty canisters, slide film, a stainless steel tank, a few chemicals, the whole nine yards.

Needless to say, I loaded up quite a few rolls and shot all of them within the next week or so. I figured since I was storing up so much film and already had half of the equipment needed to develop the film, I might as well do a bit of research on the developing process. Ordered some chemicals a week or two later, as the ones I had received were shot, and gave it a try. I think the developing process really sealed the deal for me. I mean, not only is it relatively cost efficient, but there’s something about pulling the film off of the reel and seeing the finished product that blows you away, every time.

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

Pictures of my dog. Dogs are the best. No, I’m kidding. … sort of. Anything and everything really. If it catches my eye, I’ll shoot it. I’d like to delve into street photography a bit more, but it’s not really feasible where I’m from. Rural town, pastures, and a church on every corner, the same rhythmic patterns. You know what I’m talking about. It’s not all bad though, I guess. Ultimately, I’d like to move to a more populated place.

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

35mm strictly, at the moment. I have a Pentax ME Super, and a Canon AE-1. I’m slowly delving into the wonderful abyss that is film photography though.

What types of film do you develop?

C-41 and black and white. I’ve been meaning to jump into E6 though just for the experience, as I have a bunch of slide film laying around. All in due time.

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

YouTube, Massive Dev charts, a few forums, and the “Develop” app. My first attempt at developing film went pretty well, actually. I think the biggest struggle for me initially was making sure the temperatures for the developer and fixer were correct (shooting B&W at the time). Also, making sure everything was easily accessible and ready to be used. Everything went fairly smoothly though, despite the fact of how daunting it seemed at the start.

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I currently scan the negs straight through with an EPSON V300. It’s not the best, but for $15 it gets the job done. I think it is good for generally sharing with the world. I’d like to dive into enlarging and printing sometime in the near future too, as it seems pretty awesome.

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

Literally the budget basics. The “Develop!” app, Massive Dev charts, polyethylene terephthalate bottles, a stainless steel tank, thermometer, funnel, and a bathroom that doubles as a darkroom by sealing the frame. B&W chemicals consist of Kodak D-76, and Ilford Rapid Fixer. Water is used as the stop Bath.

For color negative film, I use FPP’s C-41 Unicolor press kit. Simple, efficient, cost-effective.

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

Never. The urge to improve is ever-present. I’ll finish developing a roll, get the negatives scanned in, and be like “Damn these are cool, but they could be better.” Ever since I’ve started shooting, I’ve seen a bit of improvement in the composition and such of each roll, though.

Developing still remains somewhat of a mystery to me, truthfully. I think it may just be an experience thing, though. I actually realized I had been over-developing my film recently. But over-developed, under-developed, art is in the eye of the beholder, right? So there’s been a lot of play in the developing times and temperatures lately. Learning the boundaries, what’s appealing, so on and so forth.

A zine would be cool! So would opening some small-time “developing lab.” Id imagine these things are a bit down the road, though.

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? 

Nothing, yet. I’ve got some personal project ideas floating around, but nothing set in stone yet.

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

Give it a go. Seriously.

Part of the Process: Alex Bolen

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Alex Bolen

Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Links:

Website

Instagram

Flickr

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Negative Feedback, Instagram, Flickr, and other Facebook groups.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

I went to school for filmmaking which introduced me to 35mm cinema cameras. I wanted to replicate the look of cinema so I picked up shooting 35mm photos. Since then, I’ve expanded to shooting medium and large format as well.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

I mainly shoot portraits, street, and lifestyle, but when traveling I love taking landscape photos.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

Large Format: Sinar 4×5

Medium Format: Mamiya RB67

35mm: Nikon 35ti, Canon AE1

Instant: Polaroid Landcamera 340

Film: HP5 @ 400 & 800, Lomography 400 & 800, Portra 400, Fuji FP100c

What types of film do you develop?

C41 and black and white.

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

The first time I developed film was kind of a whirlwind. I didn’t know much about it, but since all my local shops closed down, I wanted to be able to do it myself. I gave a half-hearted Google search on how to do it, picked up some used supplies on eBay and set up shop in my dad’s dental lab. I followed the steps laid out in a Youtube video and to my surprise, I pulled out my film and found images on it. Half amazed and half confused that I did everything correctly, I quickly bought a bigger developing tank and have been doing all of my own film ever since.

Minolta 140EX // Lomography Color 400

What is your development process like now?

My current process starts with my loading all of my film onto reels in my darkroom after shooting and placing them in the developing tanks. I find it much easier to change film in a darkroom than a changing bag. My hands don’t get all sweaty and I have much more space to work.

From here I bring them over to my dad’s dental lab where I keep all of my developing chemicals and supplies. I follow a pretty standard developing process and do a final rinse with distilled water and Photo-Flo to make sure my negatives are squeaky clean.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

After my film is dry, I load them into protective sleeves and scan them in on my Epson V600. After I have digital files I run them through Lightroom where I remove dust, tweak colors, and add a little contrast.

My process is pretty straight forward and “by the books.” Although I am quite lazy with developing times and my schedule is a bit sloppy, everything tends to turn out okay.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I built a darkroom in my studio for around $400 about a year ago. I started shooting a lot of black and white and found a couple darkroom bundles on Craigslist for cheap that had everything I needed. I’ve been printing my own 35mm black and white since then and have been enjoying the process immensely. There’s something surreal about doing everything from taking the actual photo, to developing, to printing it and holding a final product in my hands.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I use a Paterson tank with Kodak D-76 developer for my black and white and Unicolor chemicals for C41. Honestly, I just bought what had the best reviews on Amazon and haven’t looked back since, haha. They’ve both worked swimmingly and I don’t feel as though I need to improve on a well oiled system as of right now.

Canon AF35ML // Agfa Vista 200

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I don’t think I’m ever content with any art venture. There’s always something more – something new that I want to try or accomplish. This year I’d love to release a very limited run zine or book with some of my work, as well as try to put on an exhibition of my landscapes I plan on taking this summer. Other than that, I just plan on exploring some new locations and trying out some new films.

Minolta 140EX // Lomography Color 400

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? 

Photography is still just a hobby for me at the moment and I haven’t really looked to do anything beyond taking photos for my own enjoyment. I recently just finished up a collaborative zine with a small film pod I’m a part of on Instagram (Space Pod), and this summer I’m looking to take some 4×5 landscapes of Northern Michigan to sell out of my uncle’s art gallery.

Other than that, I enjoy sharing my photos with friends via Instagram.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

To everyone interested in shooting/developing film but are apprehensive – GO DO IT! It’s a very strange leap and is going to take a lot of trial and error, but the beauty of the art is that it’s all about the journey along the way. You’ll learn a ton and really get to see life through a different perspective. Sure, it costs a little money, but it’s worth it. Money’s just a tool – so use it on something that’s going to build your character and leave a legacy.

Nikon 35ti // Lomography Color 400

Part of the Process: Tom Allen

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Tom Allen

Location: Suffolk, England

Links:

Instagram

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Magnum Photos, Japan Camera Hunter, The Phoblographer, Wasteoffilm and anyone I find inspiring on Instagram.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

I got interested in film photography when my dad found his Olympus and gave it to me to play around with after I had been shooting digitally for a year or two. I didn’t love it at first, but for whatever reason I kept shooting and now I’m completely taken with film and use it for all my shooting. I was shooting film for about a year before buying my own developing equipment because I realised it would be cheaper to learn than to keep sending to a lab.

Olympus OM2 + 50mm f1.4 on Ilford HP5

 

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

I like taking inspiring from all different areas, but documentary, portraiture, and landscape are the three areas I find most captivating and they are the three styles I shoot the most.

Olympus OM2 + 50mm again on HP5 @800

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

I use a 35mm Olympus OM2n and a 50mm f/1.4 that belonged to my dad.  It’s not very expensive online, but the images are beautiful and it’s smaller and more compact than most film SLRs.

Olympus OM2 + Zuiko 50mm f1.4 on Fuji C200

I also shoot 120mm film with a Yashica 635.  Again, not very expensive and it’s certainly no Rolleiflex, but the images are still very sharp and very pleasing to my eye at least.

Yashica 635 + 80mm f3.5 on Portra 400

What types of film do you develop?

I develop B&W film myself but have never developed C41 or E6.

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

I knew the basics from Youtube tutorials, and had my first experience through school, which went surprisingly well. After that, I bought a Paterson kit and started developing in my kitchen. I’m a very cautious person, so I planned my first attempts meticulously.  That has now become habit and so far I haven’t ruined a roll of film (thank goodness!).

Yashica 635 + 80mm on Ilford FP4

What is your development process like now?

I develop my film in my kitchen using times from Massive Dev Chart with all my lovely brand-loyal Ilford chemicals.  Then, I scan them with a little-bit-outdated-but-does-the-job Epson V330 scanner. After that, I choose which negatives, if any, I want to print and then I get to work printing. I test strip, dodge, burn and all that until I am happy with what I see. I then stash them away so my photography tutor can’t see them and persuade me to use them for my school work, and finally mount them in a sketchbook.

Olympus OM2 + Zuiko 50mm f1.4 on Ilford HP5

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I scan my film at home for use on social media, but printing in the darkroom is my absolute favourite way to ‘finish’ the image.  It’s also my favourite part of the film process. Don’t get me wrong, the scans are useful and nice to have, but the satisfaction of making a print, the look, the process, and the experience of it is really special and I don’t feel like I’ve truly captured an image until I take the time to print it.

I know that can sound really artsy and pretentious, and that side to film photography gets on my nerves, but printing is a lot of fun and I wouldn’t enjoy photography as much without it.

Yashica 635 + 80mm on Tri-X

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

I use Paterson tanks and reels and a changing bag because that seemed the most available brand, nothing really to do with loyalty. Brand loyalty does come into play with my chemicals because I am an Ilford user, down to being a student who lives in England where Ilford is based so can get it way way cheaper than something like Tri-X (Not to mention I like the look of Ilford’s film!). So I use Ilford ID-11 (after a brief affair with Rodinal) in a 5 litre jerry can, and then Ilfostop and Ilford Fix, too. The darkroom I use has Fotospeed developer, stop and fix for printing which work perfectly well when paired with Ilford Multigrade paper.

Yashica 635 + 80mm on Ilford HP5

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I’m pretty content for now I think.  My main focus is to put together some kind of body of work that I’m really happy with. Maybe in the future I’ll look at publishing and perhaps expanding on my developing and learning colour printing or something like that, if I can find the opportunity to do so.

Yashica 635 + 80mm on Fuji 400h

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? Feel free to give a solid summary of each project.

I’m currently working on a documentary project focused around a Victorian seaside town near where I live because of it’s strange mixture of run-down areas and up-market posh middle-class places crammed in next to each other, which I find really interesting. Alongside that, tomorrow (from the day of writing this) I’m going to shoot the first part of a portrait project on film in the studio which I was inspired to do after coming across the work of Alvin Langdon Coburn and Irving Penn.

Olympus OM2 + Zuiko 50mm f1.4 and Ilford HP5 @1600

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

I would definitely say just go for it, if you’re worried about getting it right, you’ll never know until you try, so why hold yourself back? And there’s always the friendly internet to help when you’re stuck. If you’re worried about cost, then there are always loopholes and hacks you can find.  You don’t need the best of the best equipment.  Look on eBay for good deals and find what works for you.

My final piece of advice (not that this is unique) would be to make yourself an amazing Spotify playlist for when you’re printing!

Part of the Process: Colin Staehle-Lantelme

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Colin Staehle-Lantelme

Location: Naples, Florida, USA

Links:

Website

Instagram

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Usually just YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook but i do like to try and find websites of full bodies of work.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

Honestly the mixture of a really bad break up and a tab of LSD is what kickstarted my passion for film. My roommate at the time had the day off from school and knew I was having a bad time dealing with the break up and offered to trip with me. Before we left our apartment I grabbed my Nikkormat at the last second (first time i used it in about 4 years).

I remember looking through the viewfinder and saying one of two phrases the entire day “It’s going to look like this” or “that could be a shoegaze album cover”. I got the roll back from the lab a week later and every shot was perfect. Since then, photography has been therapy for me. Soon after that day, I signed up for this community darkroom class in Orlando and continued to rent out the darkroom months after.

Olympus XA2
Agfa APX 400

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

Growing up in the fashion industry I’ve always been drawn to fashion photography. But I do love shooting skateboarding and musicians as well. I always take a few portraits of all my subjects as well.

Whenever I go to shoot a new client, I usually treat the shoot like we are just hanging out.  I try to have some introspective conversations, make their thoughts stimulating.  It usually makes the shoot a little smoother and brings more emotion into the model. I usually get a bowl of ramen with them after the shoot, too.

Nikkormat EL
50mm f/1.2
Ilford HP5+

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

For 35mm I shoot with a Leica M6 and an Olympus XA2. I recently switched from digital to exclusively film for my professional work.  The M6 just offers me a feeling of complete reliability. I used to shoot on a Nikkormat EL and it used to be a nightmare.  I’ve had to refund clients because of that camera. The Olympus is great for my more “experimental” projects as a lot of my work is inspired by psychedelics so the XA just offers something simple and durable for me . All I have to do is focus on composition and hit the shutter.

Leica M6
Voigtlander 35mm F/1.4
Kodak Tri-X 400

For medium format, I use a Hasselblad 500C/M. That was my dream camera since I started shooting (almost eleven years now). It’s what my cousin, Brian Lantelme, (who is a massive drive in my work) used in the 70’s and 80’s when he was shooting the Transgender and Drag community in New York City. Other than the camera being a flawless machine, and the 6×6 format somewhat forcing me to push my composition boundaries, choosing this camera was mostly cathartic.

Olympus XA2
Agfa APX 400

I recently got into instant photography which i use a Polaroid 450 Land camera. I just love the feeling of showing a client a shot during a shoot. Especially with the beautiful colors Fujifilm FP-100c has to offer. My standard film used to be Ilford’s HP5+ and Fujifilm Pro400H but since the announcement of Kodak’s Ektachrome making a return and the rumors of Kodachrome coming back, I felt obligated to give Kodak all my money. I primarily shoot with Tri-X400 and Provia 400 now.

What types of film do you develop?

Mostly black and white.

Nikkormat EL
50mm f/1.2
Ilford HP5+

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

My teacher, Peter Schryer, walked me through the process. It was a euphoric experience, between the sounds of the flickering lights and the ac unit kicking on and off, and the smells of the chemicals, it became nirvana. I was probably listening to Velvet Underground or My Bloody Valentine (my usual go to darkroom soundtrack).

Just the feeling of being able to create photos from start to finish was very rewarding. Honestly the best advice i can give is be patient, explore different techniques, and play good music (makes the development time seem not as long).

Hasselblad 500C/M
60mm f/3.5
Ilford HP5+

What is your development process like now?

So I always start with picking music, usually some sort of shoegaze. I pour my chemicals then start loading my development tanks. During the rinse phase, I always smoke a cigarette to time my cycle. For enlarging, I usually make a base print of all the pictures i want to enlarge, dry them, then make my notes for cropping, dodging and burning. Then work on my final prints.

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I actually scan every roll and create a contact sheet for each roll. I enlarge my own images as well.

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

For my enlarger, I use a Besseler 67SC with a Rodogon 80mm lens, Paterson tanks, Epson V500 scanner, and just various old odds and ends. About 90% of my darkroom was purchased through a good friend of mine named Michael who owns Kiwi Camera Services in Winter Park, Fl. He gave me a killer deal on everything, and is still providing insight and little gifts here and there. Last I was there for a gallery showing, he gave me a vintage bottle of retouching ink. He’s the man! For chemicals, I use all Kodak powder solutions, D-76 for developer.

Nikkormat EL
50mm f/1.2
Ilford HP5+

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I’m never content with my work, which is what pushes me to continue. I love that I found something I can completely obsess about and constantly learn from. I’m actually moving to Denver to peruse a career in journalism, for both the writing and photography aspects. I used to be a literature major, so writing as been a big part of my life.

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? Feel free to give a solid summary of each project.

I’ve done a lot of personal projects and commissioned work, but my favorite project was shooting Tampa Pro 2017. One of my friends started a blog/zine called SR50 in Orlando and he offered me the job. It was 3 days of partying with the heroes of my adolescence.  I got portraits of professional skaters like Jamie Thomas, Torry Pudwil, Lizard King and Geoff Rowley (tons more, too). Being able to just sit on the ramps and get the shots I actually wanted was so surreal. I actually had a spot in a gallery with some of my enlargements from Tampa Pro.

Leica M6
Voigtlander 35mm F/1.4
Kodak Tri-X 400

While i was living in Orlando, I shot one of Aesop Rock’s shows. My homie, DJ Zone, who did the scratching on his newest album, got me photo passes last minute. I got to the venue like three hours early and tried to sneak in. I saw Rob Sonic outside smoking a cigarette and I decided to try and talk to him I asked him “Hey, you with the Social?”  He replied, “Nah man.” I said, “Damn I am just trying to see my homie Patrick.” He replied with “Oh, you’re Zone’s homie? Come with me, I’m Bobby, if anyone gives you shit, tell them Bobby sent you.” It was a wild experience.

Nikkormat EL
50mm f/1.2
Ilford HP5+

Nikkormat EL
50mm f/1.2
Ilford HP5+

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

Just dive in!  It’s a rewarding experience. Find a cheap camera and never leave it at home.

 

Part of the Process: Tayden MacDonald

Part of the Process is a series of posts that puts the spotlight on film photographers and DIY film developers.  These features provide unique experiences and perspectives on shooting and developing film while also showcasing diverse talent and film photographers around the globe.  If you are interested in being featured, feel free to contact me!

Name: Tayden MacDonald

Location: Seattle, Washington, United States

Links:

VSCO

Instagram

What other websites or blogs do you keep up with to feed your photographic interests?

Youtube Channels such as Negative Feedback and Matt Day.

What attracted you to film photography? How did you get started/introduced to shooting film? How soon after did you start developing?

My sister had a 35mm camera, and would shoot a roll here and there. I always liked photography but cameras were expensive. My sister let me try a roll, and I was surprised how detailed the photos came out. The color was amazing! Nothing compared to a digital camera. I then bought a Canon AE-1, and learned the basics of photography on that camera.

Canon EOS 850. 50mm 1.8. Cinestill 800

What do you like to shoot on a regular basis?

Portraits

What formats, cameras, and films do you shoot? What do you like about the formats, cameras, films you prefer? 

Hasselblad 500c/m: The detail in a medium format camera is way better than a 35mm camera. I love shooting the Hasselblad because everything about it screams quality, from forwarding the film to clicking the shutter to opening the waist level viewfinder. Shooting the Hasselblad is an experience that you can’t get from a digital camera.

Hasselblad 500c/m. 80mm Zeiss T*. Ektar 100

Olympus XA: A great small camera to carry around and capture everyday moments, However the quality is nothing compared to medium format. I do enjoy the luxury of having 36 exposures though.

Olympus XA. HP5

Bell & Howell 675/XL Super 8 Camera: I love not being able to see what you have just shot. Film photography gets more special when shooting video. The experience of putting your roll of film through a projector and watching what you recorded is much more rewarding then going through your negatives. If you love film, you have to try Super 8! Plus Kodak is going to make Super 8 more affordable in the future with their new super 8 camera.

Land Polaroid 335: In terms of polaroids I prefer a 4×5 format shot on a land. I don’t understand why people buy crappy polaroids from Urban Outfitters, when they can get a a better Land polaroid for a better deal. Though that Fuji doesn’t make FP-100c anymore, you can still find a 10pack for $20 which is the same price or cheaper then Impossible Film, which I’m not a huge fan of. My favorite part of shooting the polaroid is pulling the film out of the camera. Feeling the rollers crush the chemical pack, is sensational, haha.

Hasselblad 500c/m. 80mm Zeiss T*. Ektar 100

What types of film do you develop?

Black and white as well as C41.

Hasselblad 500c/m. 80mm Zeiss T*. HP5

Tell us about your first experiences in developing your own film.  How did you muster the courage to give it a shot? What resources did you use?

I’m a Senior in High School, and my photography teacher was contacted by someone who had a bunch of darkroom supplies that they wanted to donate. Luckily for me, I am the only one in my school who shoots film, so i got a bunch of chemicals, enlarger, reels, trays, etc. She also gave me a Nikon FE2 with a bunch of lenses which was a come up! I then bought a few more supplies and developed some B&W 35mm Film.

Nikon FE. Fuji Pro 400h

I learned most of everything by reading what to do online. I spent hours watching videos and not understanding a word they said. I have ruined so many rolls of film, because of lack of experience. My biggest troubles lately are developing 120 film. It will take me a hour to the film on the reel, and then I will give up. I hurts when I ruin a roll, because of all the time and money a spent in taking the photos and developing them is wasted and the photos are memories are lost. I will never be able to preserve that image in my head. Big risks come with big rewards! The more struggle makes the next roll more rewarding.

What is your development process like now?

Shoot. Develop. Scan on Epson v600. Share with friends.

Canon EOS 850. 50mm 1.8. Portra 160

What’s your processes regarding scanning, enlarging, and/or printing your work?

I scan most of my work. Enlarging is an all day event for me and I just don’t have the time. I converted my laundry room into a darkroom, therefore I have to tape the door so no light creeps in. I literally can’t get out of my laundry room until I am done.

What equipment are you using to develop your film and why?

Most of my equipment is given to me. I HATE Paterson Tanks! I can’t load 120 film on it in a bag!

Are you content with where you are now with your shooting and developing? Do you have any future plans or ambitions?

I try to be content with everything in my life. I have no future goals… besides simply improving my skills.

Hasselblad 500c/m. 80mm Zeiss T*. Portra 400

Have you completed any notable projects or in the process of creating something from the film you have shot and developed? Feel free to give a solid summary of each project.

It has been hard to create meaningful work. I think I just need to shoot more. Perhaps I’ll have a show or put together a zine one day. For now, I’m just working on my skills.

Hasselblad 500c/m. 80mm Zeiss T*. HP5

What advice can you give to others who are interested in shooting and developing film but are apprehensive about getting started?

There is nothing to lose. After you’re first roll, you’ll be hooked. Film camera will maintain their value!

Hasselblad 500c/m. 80mm Zeiss T*. Ektar 100