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My First Roll: Cat Wood

My First Roll is a series for film photographers to share the images from their first roll of film.  Everyone starts shooting at a different time and for different reasons.  Some shooters may have started shooting yesterday while others have started shooting decades ago.  This series provides a glimpse into the humble beginnings of individual photographers, encouraging us to reflect on our earlier work to find beauty and appreciation in our inexperience and to understand how we got to where we our now and where we want to go in our photographic journey.

Cat Wood, of Atlanta, GA., shares her first roll of film from 2012 when she was just sixteen years old.  In Cat’s submission email, she mentioned how nice it was to reflect on these images and see how far she has come.  If these images are any indication of what her early work was like, then I highly recommend you go check out her latest at the links provided below.

Cat Wood (Instagram, Flickr, Tumblr), Summer 2012.

Nikon n6006 on Kodak Gold 400.

 

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untitled: a photo series _ disposable camera recap

On January 13th, we had quite the opening party for another iteration of untitled: a photo series, this time taking place at Cafe Hey in Tampa, FL.  This time around, we left out a few disposable cameras for the guests to take photos with in hopes that they would make this an event that people can actively participate in (and get more people to shoot film!) rather than passively just looking at pictures on a wall.  Of course, having Blacksmith play at the opening didn’t hurt, but it looks like the disposable cameras will be a staple at future events.

To put it simply, I (and the rest of the photographers involved) want to give a huge thank you to everyone who played a part in making this event as enjoyable and as chill as it was.  Judging by these photos, you all may have had as good of time as we did.

We hope to see you all again next time.

untitled: a photo series, january 2018 edition

I am excited to announce that I will be exhibiting some work alongside some other very talented Tampa Area photographers at Cafe Hey in Tampa Heights.  There will be an opening party this coming weekend.  I hope to see you there to enjoy a whole lot of photos, music by local talent Blacksmith, coffee, beer, full food menu, and just an overall good time.  Details are provided in the flyer and below:

untitled: a photo series

Cafe Hey

1540 N Franklin St. Tampa, FL 33602

January 13, 2018 @ 7PM, Blacksmith to play at 8:30.

Works displayed by Dylan Barnes, Ryan Berger, Caleb Hartman, Jordan Schmidt, Luis Espel, Jeremy Evans, and more!

My First Roll: Luis Espel II

My First Roll is a series for film photographers to share the images from their first roll of film.  Everyone starts shooting at a different time and for different reasons.  Some shooters may have started shooting yesterday while others have started shooting decades ago.  This series provides a glimpse into the humble beginnings of individual photographers, encouraging us to reflect on our earlier work to find beauty and appreciation in our inexperience and to understand how we got to where we our now and where we want to go in our photographic journey.

Luis Espel II, of Tampa, FL, shares his first roll of film from just a few years ago when he was wielding the Minolta SR-T 202.  The images were taken on generic neighborhood pharmacy film and are speckled with dust and hair that we all become familiar with at one point or another, and for better or worse.  In this case, it’s definitely for the better.

Luis Espel II, 2011.

Minolta SR-T 202, Walgreens Color Film.

 

Books & Zines: All the Places I Thought Were Strange

Today, we take a look at Amy Jordan’s zine All the Places I Thought Were Strange.  Amy is a contemporary landscape photographer living and working in Portland, Oregon.  Amy specializes in working with black and white themes.  Amy’s latest zine includes twenty pages of monochrome images in an 8.5×11 format, taken between 2015 and 2017.  These images put a spotlight on what the title simply states: places she found to be strange.

The opening preface by Harper S. sets the stage for the zine and gives remnants of a feeling of entanglement with an inability to break free from unfamiliarity.

Looking through the images, some places are more obviously strange than others.  While all images have something “off” about the environment recorded, I specifically enjoyed the images that has a single or simplistic element that breaks a balance or pattern that would be there otherwise.

Amy does a great job in allowing you to experience the set up of each shot through her mind, framing, and finally snapping the shutter.  A great expression of her planning and photographic vision.

Of course, like any other black and white images, the beauty is either constrained or exuded by its lack of color. Many of the images in Amy’s latest work are not only visually appealing in their content, but show a rather wonderful use of lighting and contrast.

Perhaps my favorite aspect of these images is that the landscapes are rather common places that most people would walk by and think nothing of, however Amy does her best (and succeeds) in making the ordinary world into an extraordinary photograph, and ultimately a body of work.

Thanks so much to Amy for reaching out and submitting her latest zine.  This is definitely a great collection of photos to have for anyone who loves contrasty, black and white images.  To see more of Amy’s photos and to inquire about purchasing your own copy, check out her Instagram accounts here and here.

If you have a book or a zine that you would like to have featured here on Now Developing, feel free to send an email!

Camera Giveaway: Minox 35 EL

It’s time for another camera giveaway. This time, I will be giving away a Minox 35EL. The Minox is an amazingly small, compact camera, with a great lens! Camera will include original box, manual, and a roll of Fuji Superia Xtra 400. As always, participants both domestic and international are eligible to enter.

To enter the giveaway:
1. Make sure your following @Now.Developing on Instagram
2. Like this photo on Instagram
3. Tag three photographer friends in a comment in this photo on Instagram

The winner will be randomly selected and announced in 10 days, on January 16, 2018. Winner will be contacted via Instagram direct message.

Shutter Sounds 005

Shutter Sounds is a monthly, ten-song music playlist based upon my most-played music of the previous month.  These monthly compilations are not limited or constrained to any theme or genre.  They are simply a selection of songs that I chose from my most played artists of the month for the readers to enjoy while shooting, spending time in the darkroom, or want to listen to something new.

Shutter Sounds_005, January 2018.

Spotify: https://goo.gl/YDwaF3 

Tracklist:

  1. It’s All in Vain, Wet
  2. That’s not me, The Black Skirts
  3. Silhouette (Latin Skin), Seahaven
  4. I’m My own Doctor, Remo Drive
  5. Rocket Man, Dumbfoundead
  6. iffy, Sik-K, PH1, Jay Park
  7. Nowadays, Lil Skies
  8. I wanna be the picture on ur homescreen, 93FEETOFSMOKE
  9. TTYL, Global Dan
  10. Me You, Russ

My First Roll: Michael Fil

My First Roll is a series for film photographers to share the images from their first roll of film.  Everyone starts shooting at a different time and for different reasons.  Some shooters may have started shooting yesterday while others have started shooting decades ago.  This series provides a glimpse into the humble beginnings of individual photographers, encouraging us to reflect on our earlier work to find beauty and appreciation in our inexperience and to understand how we got to where we our now and where we want to go in our photographic journey.  If you would like to share images from your first roll of film, send me an email.

Micahel Fil from Santiago de Cuba, Cuba shares his first roll of film taken on his Canon AE-1 on Rollei Retro 400S in November of 2014.  The images exemplify why the Canon AE-1 is such a classic camera, but also show Michael’s talents in capturing a beautiful image.

Michael Fil (Website), November 2014.

Canon AE-1, Rollei Retro 400S.

Student Photo Exhibition 2017

Last week, the first half of the school year came to a close.  What that meant for me and my twenty photography students was that it was time to show their friends and families what that have been doing for the past eighteen weeks.

Every year, I put together a small photography exhibition of my film photography students’ work at our school. As most film shooters can agree, it’s so much nicer to see and hold a tangible image.  The printing process, both through enlarging and digital scanning and printing, is not a step I like to skip over when it comes to the club.  We get a little dressed up, display our gear and our images, and talk to our guests about our processes and experiences as photographers.  It’s always held the week before we get off for the Winter break, and something about that makes the environment a bit cozier and more intimate.

Every year is always better than the last, although I am not sure how it can get much better.  Although, I do try to add a new element to the club each year to make it better and a bit more unique from the last.  This year, we were able to add a darkroom within the school to our program.  In addition to this, I also changed up my instruction a bit as well.  In years past, I started my beginner students with point and shoots, however I decided this year that everyone was getting an SLR.  The images, the crowd, and the vibe of the evening did not disappoint.

This year, I was lucky enough to have two assistants help me run the club.  These two now-high-school students are past students of mine that came back every Wednesday evening to donate their time for the club.  Not only are they extremely helpful but have become pretty darn good photographers, too.  Without them, my job would not be as easy, that’s for sure.

On the two days leading up to the event, we spent a bit of time preparing for the event.  We gathered all of the darkroom prints, placed them in individual folders to go home with the students, printed some digital copies for display, made name cards, put together some gift bags, hung photos, mood-lit the space and decorated accordingly.

At about a quarter-to-seven, my students with their friends and families started filing into what is essentially our all-purpose room.  When seven p.m. rolled around, I gave a little talk on the status of the film world as I know it, basically just explaining the fact that there is a pretty big, and very passionate, close-knit community of die hard film enthusiasts that are keeping the craft alive.  Not only that, but that this community is ecstatic that these students are shooting film and support us specifically and individually.  And that due to this enthusiasm and the people within the community, this club and event is all made possible.

Thanks to the cameras we use donated from the Film Photography Project and the gifts that the kids got to go home with from Shoot Film Co., this event truly comes together.  In addition to that, my administration is extremely supportive of what I do and I also have a pretty good support system made up of my closest friends who also shoot film to come out to check out the kids’ work and really make the kids feel good about what they do.  I just want to make it clear that even though I am the one directly instructing and interacting with these students, it takes the village of film shooters to make this what it is.

After making a short introductory speech, guests enter our gallery hallway which is lined with photos, and sprinkled with cameras, developing materials, and other things to spark conversation and questions from our guests.  This is where parents and students both excitedly search for where their photos are located, take some pictures together, eat some cookies while I usually I get to talk to some of the families and tell them more about how great their kids are simply for being a part of the club and what I love about their work specifically.

We also set up a couple of neat displays, one being of some old glass plate negatives that one of my coworkers picked up for me at a yard sale a few years back.  It’s a cool way to let people see what film was before film was….well, film.  Next to these, we also display some of our darkroom tests prints to show the guests parts of the process that may not be regularly visible in a final presentation.  It gives great insight to the fact that this is a process that takes a lot of trial and error and that mistakes are not only commonplace, but are expected to occur in order to make us better at our craft.

While students and parents walk around, admire photos and take photos of their young photographers in front of their work, I quietly peruse the space with one of my close friends to choose five photos that will receive recognition in the form of a certificate when everyone returns to the the seating area.

As things start to wind down, everyone eventually heads back to the all-purpose room where students are called up individually to receive their gift bag and darkroom prints.  Gift bags include a few film-related pieces from Mike Padua of Shoot Film Co: stickers, buttons, and notebooks.  This time also gives me a great opportunity to quickly speak and compliment (maybe embarrass, too) the students personally on their work as I show their darkroom prints to the audience.

After all students receive their things, I close things with a thank you to not only the students, but also to their parents who support their children and their artistic interests, something that I think schools could all use a bit more of.  At this point, I usually talk just enough to make myself cry because I am so dang proud of these kids.  But this time, I made sure to cut the speech just short of that to wish everyone a great holiday and to give a thanks to the kids for allowing me to be a part of their every Wednesday just to experience and appreciate the photographic process together.

All images taken by Nick Anatala.

My First Roll: Ryan McKenna

My First Roll is a series for film photographers to share the images from their first roll of film.  Everyone starts shooting at a different time and for different reasons.  Some shooters may have started shooting yesterday while others have started shooting decades ago.  This series provides a glimpse into the humble beginnings of individual photographers, encouraging us to reflect on our earlier work to find beauty and appreciation in our inexperience and to understand how we got to where we our now and where we want to go in our photographic journey.

Ryan McKenna shares his first roll from 2015.  These images were shot on a Nikon FM2n and definitely can make anyone lust over a camera like that after seeing images like these.  The camera and film used truly bring out the beauty in the environment in which they were shot.

Ryan McKenna, September 7th, 2015.

Nikon FM2n w/ 50mm 1.4 AI-S on Kodak Gold 200